RIP OAPL: An Academic Publisher Vanishes
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

RIP OAPL: An Academic Publisher Vanishes

A dubious predatory academic publisher called Open Access Publishing London (OAPL) seems to have died. Their website has gone down, taking some 1,500 scientific papers with it. What can we learn from this? Long-time readers will remember my series of posts on OAPL back from when I first investigated it in 2013. As far as…

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Condition For The Deflection of Vertical Cracks at Dissimilar Ice Interfaces On Europa
Posted in Science Space Physics

Condition For The Deflection of Vertical Cracks at Dissimilar Ice Interfaces On Europa

The surface of Europa contains many quasi-circular morphologies called lenticulae. Although the formation mechanism of lenticulae is not understood, sill intrusion from the subsurface ocean is one promising hypothesis. However, it remains unclear how vertical cracks from the ocean deflect horizontally to allow sill intrusion in Europa. In this study, the critical stress intensity factor…

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The Path that MASCOT Took Across Asteroid Ryugu During its 17 Hours of Life
Posted in Science Space Physics

The Path that MASCOT Took Across Asteroid Ryugu During its 17 Hours of Life

The tiny hopping-robot MASCOT completed its 17 hour mission on the asteroid Ryugu in early October. Now the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has released an image of MASCOT’s path across the asteroid. Surprised by what MASCOT found on the surface, they’ve named the landing spot “Alice’s Wonderland.” MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout) was dropped onto…

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Why tropical forests are so ecologically diverse
Posted in Science

Why tropical forests are so ecologically diverse

Working with high-resolution satellite imaging technology, researchers from Brown University and the University of California, Los Angeles have uncovered new clues in an age-old question about why tropical forests are so ecologically diverse. In studying Handroanthus guayacan,a common tropical tree species, over a 10-year period, they found that the tree population increased mainly in locations…

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The Fidgeting Brain
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

The Fidgeting Brain

A new review paper in The Neuroscientist highlights the problem of body movements for neuroscience, from blinks to fidgeting. Authors Patrick J Drew and colleagues of Penn State discuss how many types of movements are associated with widespread brain activation, which can contaminate brain activity recordings. This is true, they say, of both humans and…

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Rotational ‘Goldilocks’ Zones for Fractional Habitability and Silicate Weathering
Posted in Science Space Physics

Rotational ‘Goldilocks’ Zones for Fractional Habitability and Silicate Weathering

Planetary rotation rate has a significant effect on atmospheric circulation, where the strength of the Coriolis effect in part determines the efficiency of latitudinal heat transport, altering cloud distributions, surface temperatures, and precipitation patterns. In this study we use the ROCKE-3D dynamic-ocean general circulation model to study the effects of slow rotations and increased insolations…

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Soyuz Launch Carrying Two Astronauts is Forced to Abort, Landing Safely Back on Earth
Posted in Science Space Physics

Soyuz Launch Carrying Two Astronauts is Forced to Abort, Landing Safely Back on Earth

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying crew to the ISS was aborted shortly after launch on Thursday, Oct. 11th when its booster failed. The spacecraft executed an emergency ballistic landing with a sharp angle of descent. Both crew members on board—American astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin—exited the capsule safely and are in good…

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Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves
Posted in Science

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) — operators of the world’s largest particle physics lab — near Geneva, Switzerland, is said to be the largest particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator lies in a tunnel 27 kilometers in circumference, as deep as 175 meters beneath the French-Swiss…

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What “First Man” Gets Fabulously Right About NASA: An Interview with Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

What “First Man” Gets Fabulously Right About NASA: An Interview with Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden

Neil Armstrong (left) as portrayed by Ryan Gosling in First Man (Credit: Universal) First Man is not like other movies about the space race, and I mean that in a very good way. I’ll admit, I was skeptical about the director of La La Land telling the story of Neil Armstrong’s historic landing on the…

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Ganymede Shows Evidence of Past Strike-slip Faulting
Posted in Science Space Physics

Ganymede Shows Evidence of Past Strike-slip Faulting

A recently published study led by researchers at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth’s San Andreas fault. This is the first study to…

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