The Fidgeting Brain
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

The Fidgeting Brain

A new review paper in The Neuroscientist highlights the problem of body movements for neuroscience, from blinks to fidgeting. Authors Patrick J Drew and colleagues of Penn State discuss how many types of movements are associated with widespread brain activation, which can contaminate brain activity recordings. This is true, they say, of both humans and…

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Rotational ‘Goldilocks’ Zones for Fractional Habitability and Silicate Weathering
Posted in Science Space Physics

Rotational ‘Goldilocks’ Zones for Fractional Habitability and Silicate Weathering

Planetary rotation rate has a significant effect on atmospheric circulation, where the strength of the Coriolis effect in part determines the efficiency of latitudinal heat transport, altering cloud distributions, surface temperatures, and precipitation patterns. In this study we use the ROCKE-3D dynamic-ocean general circulation model to study the effects of slow rotations and increased insolations…

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Soyuz Launch Carrying Two Astronauts is Forced to Abort, Landing Safely Back on Earth
Posted in Science Space Physics

Soyuz Launch Carrying Two Astronauts is Forced to Abort, Landing Safely Back on Earth

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying crew to the ISS was aborted shortly after launch on Thursday, Oct. 11th when its booster failed. The spacecraft executed an emergency ballistic landing with a sharp angle of descent. Both crew members on board—American astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin—exited the capsule safely and are in good…

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Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves
Posted in Science

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) — operators of the world’s largest particle physics lab — near Geneva, Switzerland, is said to be the largest particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator lies in a tunnel 27 kilometers in circumference, as deep as 175 meters beneath the French-Swiss…

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What “First Man” Gets Fabulously Right About NASA: An Interview with Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

What “First Man” Gets Fabulously Right About NASA: An Interview with Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden

Neil Armstrong (left) as portrayed by Ryan Gosling in First Man (Credit: Universal) First Man is not like other movies about the space race, and I mean that in a very good way. I’ll admit, I was skeptical about the director of La La Land telling the story of Neil Armstrong’s historic landing on the…

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Ganymede Shows Evidence of Past Strike-slip Faulting
Posted in Science Space Physics

Ganymede Shows Evidence of Past Strike-slip Faulting

A recently published study led by researchers at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology reveals Ganymede, an icy moon of Jupiter, appears to have undergone complex periods of geologic activity, specifically strike-slip tectonism, as is seen in Earth’s San Andreas fault. This is the first study to…

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Next Generation Telescopes Could Use “Teleportation” to Take Better Images
Posted in Science Space Physics

Next Generation Telescopes Could Use “Teleportation” to Take Better Images

Telescopes have come a long way in the past few centuries. From the comparatively modest devices built by astronomers like Galileo Galilei and Johannes Kepler, telescopes have evolved to become massive instruments that require an entire facility to house them and a full crew and network of computers to run them. And in the coming…

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New mechanism for how animal cells stay intact
Posted in Science

New mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Almost eight years ago, Stanford University bioengineer Manu Prakash was looking for a way to watch every cell in an adult living, behaving animal in elaborate detail. He searched the catalog of life and happened upon the simple marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens — or Tplax, as Prakash has come to call it. This ultra-flat animal…

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Visualization of Pacific ocean temperatures shows El Niño brewing, heralding possible winter weather impacts
Posted in Genetics & Live Science Science

Visualization of Pacific ocean temperatures shows El Niño brewing, heralding possible winter weather impacts

This animation shows how sea surface temperatures have departed from the long-term average, from August through early October 2018. (Animation by climate.gov; data from NOAA’s Environmental Visualization Lab.) It’s still not here yet, but El Niño sure looks like it’s coming. In its latest forecast, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center says there is a 70 to 75 percent…

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Galactic Panspermia
Posted in Science Space Physics

Galactic Panspermia

We present an analytic model to estimate the total number of rocky or icy objects that could be captured by planetary systems within the Milky Way galaxy and result in panspermia should they harbor life. We estimate the capture rate of objects ejected from planetary systems over the entire phase space as well as time.…

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